Matt

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    94 comments  ·  Newspapers we should add next  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Open - Under review  ·  62 comments  ·  Newspapers we should add next  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Matt commented  · 

    During the summer holidays we would visit the outdoor swimming pool in Bath Road. The first indication when near to the entrance was the strong smell of chlorine and the sound of the two water fountains.
    No matter what time of year or the weather of the day the cubicle area was always cold and wet. We would undress behind a half door in the cubicle and take our clothes and deposit them in a green painted tall steel locker, I do not recall there being a door lock of any description. We then had to walk through a very cold foot bath before entering the large paved area surrounding the swimming pool itself.
    The pool was divided into three sections, two graded shallow areas either side of the deep central pool that had a three tier diving board and single spring board. There were no poolside attendants to oversea the pool activities and even children had access to the high board and would "bomb" into the water splashing everyone in the immediate vicinity. There was a large sunbathing terrace with an area equipped for exercising comprising of gymnastic rings and a horizontal bar. The paved areas would get very hot in the sunshine and we would run for the cool waters of the pool when we could stand no more. Some days were reserved for schools and best avoided. There was no cafeteria as such but snack bar where we could buy a piece of fruit cake but not much more as this was still the post war era and no sweets or chocolate could be purchased.
    When first visiting the pool I was still unable to swim but could do an impressive fake swim bouncing off the pool floor on tip toes but then after learning to glide face down toward the hand hold at the pool edge I soon picked it up and enjoyed being in the deep central section. The best part of the expedition was dressing and feeling the warmth of our clothes again.

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    51 comments  ·  Newspapers we should add next  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Matt commented  · 

    I remember the Shoe Polish Factory in Grantham Road at the bottom Water lane and Park Avenue being on fire that took an age to put out, it was on my way home from School, also the Train Derailment on the Viaduct at Water Lane. Also, there was Pie Dynamics at Park Avenue I think it was on the junction of Otterspool Way when the Harrier Jump Jet came outside and hovered as they made something that controlled something inside it that was great and very noisy to see. Mary Peters opening the Hartspring Sports Centre which I think is a housing estate now.
    How things change, not necessarily for the better.

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    87 comments  ·  Newspapers we should add next  ·  Flag idea as inappropriate…  ·  Admin →
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    Matt commented  · 

    I was born in 1951 at Parsons Green maternity home. I have many memories of my mum's family. My nan lived in Bayonne Road, Escourt Road, Heckfield Place, Bramber Road, Cassidy Road, Fairholme Road and latterly Charleville Road, then having to move out of her rented home in Charleville Road and live in a two rooms with her eldest son in Shepherds Bush, because the landlord increased the rent, until she was rehoused by the council on the Roehampton Estate. My grandad, who died very young and I didn't know, used to walk all the way from Fulham to Covent Garden and carry baskets of flowers all the way back home on his head. They used to sell them in North End Road and my nan sold bunches of violets. They had seven children and managed to rent a shop in Charleville Road with accommodation above. They opened a greengrocers. My grandad died in 1943 leaving my nan a widow with seven children. All the children helped out in the shop until she had to give up the shop because she couldn't manage it anymore but continued to live above the shop. She then became a cleaner. I used to go to my nan's on a Saturday for dinner with many of the family. She cooked in a very old scullery with a black range and gas cooker, wooden dresser, belfast sink and wooden table. Her children used to help her manage. Everyone would gather round and she would feed us all. Remember many trips to North End Road. Unrecognisable now. The house in Charleville Road is now basically eighteen high rent studio rooms. Fulham is so different today.

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