Anne

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    Anne commented  · 

    hii i'm looking for information about arthur & hannah henderson nee ring,they lived in 28 wightman st,canning town according to the 1931 census,he was a dock labourer.they had 3 children,arthur 11,alfred 6 and jessie 2.thats all i know.my father,fred was born later in 1964 but i don't know if they had moved on by then. i am curious as to what happened to them,any information would be appreciated.thank you, maurice

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    Anne commented  · 

    The article was not the first time Richard had been mentioned in the local newspaper. Richard Palmer was born in 1942, and was one of the triplets born to Daisy & Stephen "Jack" Palmer (Elizabeth & Rosemarie were the other triplets). This was such a newsworthy event that The Portsmouth News ran an article which featured a photo of Daisy Palmer (nee Chandler) and the triplets accompanied by midwives wearing face masks. Daisy & Jack only discovered they were expecting triplets when Daisy was due to give birth. Instead of one baby, they got three; in those days there were no such thing as pre-natal scans or IVF! The family lived in Percy Road, an area bombed heavily during the war. Apparently, during an air raid, Daisy held these three little babies in her arms whilst shuffling down on her bottom, from the top of the house stairs to the very last step, to get them safely into the air raid shelter in the garden! Daisy was born in 1911, and if she were still alive this year would have been her 100th birthday.

    The family story goes that these were the first triplets to be born in Portsmouth. The triplet's arrival coincided with a severe weather storm that affected most of Britain. The Palmer and Chandler families and the local community rallied around to ensure this trio of tots had enough clothing and food to keep them going. There are stories of them having to sleep in a chest of drawers as there was only one cot. At the time, Jack was employed by Portsmouth United Breweries as a draymen/driver. Records of the breweries wage accounts still exist, and I have managed to locate the accounts for 1942. Interestingly, just before the triplets were born, Jack had a pay increase of 10 shillings. I wonder if he went to his boss to negotiate a pay rise to help with his growing family. As well as the triplets, the couple had a daughter, Jean, and a son, John.

    Joan has also been mentioned in the local newspaper. Joan was born in 1943, the eldest of 10 children born to proud parents William and Doris Cryer. When Joan was 16 years old, she and her siblings made the headlines in the local newspaper. Just before Christmas 1959, Joan and eight of her siblings were admitted to a Portsmouth hospital within 24 hours of each other. Patricia was the only sibling to escape hospitalisation.

    Joan recalls being told off by the matron for listening to the radio and jiving with her sisters to songs by Elvis Presley & Cliff Richard. One of the children had to be drip fed, and recalls she was so hungry that she asked a nurse if she could have a biscuit "No. Not even a crumb" replied the nurse. Following the newspaper article, kind readers from near and far sent in many presents for the children. Some presents even arrived from America. Many people sent in sweets for the children, and at teatime the nurse would bring in a tray laden with sandwiches and sweeties. The nurse had to manoeuvre her way through a swing door, and as she announced "teatime" the door swung back and knocked the tray flying. The children were delighted and scrambled around on the floor collecting the sweeties. Luckily, they all recovered and made it home to Stratton Close in Portsea

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