Barry

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    Barry commented  · 

    I was brought up in Havelock St, Lower Broughton. Round the corner was the police box and the Dry Cleaners, with Timothy White’s Chemist over the road, near Sussex St. Havelock St used to come off Hough Lane (which met Lower Broughton Road at one end, and Peel Park, at the other end), and the next streets up were Clyde St (where they had a corner shop, and an off license), and Raglan Street. Right at the top was Peel Park, where I played all my football, with my best mates, Frank Seenan & Steve Pope. I remember the fire at the waxworks (near the park) and the wax coming all the way down to the dry cleaners, which used to be next to Bob’s the Barber’s on Lower Broughton Road.

    I remember going to St. Boniface’s school (where there was also a police box), on Frederick Road (the other end, right at the top, was the college/uni). I remember breaking Robert Leakey’s leg in a fight, and being brought up in front of the class by the headmaster, Mr. Delaney. Hope you’re OK Robert. I also remember sending Sheila Lengden, a love letter when I was about 10, and starting to play with her brother John, who was 2 years younger, so I could go to her house, and see her. She used to pal around with Anne-Marie McGladery. We played St. Thomas’s in the Rounders final, and they beat us 1-0 (incredibly low score for a rounders match). Eventually my mates went to St. Albert’s secondary (Paul Heatley, John Gilligan, Mike McLaughlin etc who had trials for United). Because I passed my 11+ I had to go to St. Peter’s grammar on Bury New (or was it old) Road.

    I’ve lived in Blackpool since I was 15 years old, but nothing will ever take away those memories, from the great, great people of Salford, of who I am very proud, even though it was voted the worst slums in the UK, when I left in 1970.

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    Barry commented  · 

    Does anyone have any information about a Mr Derek Lee. He went to Australia in 1953 with his parents, and lived at Wollongong. In the early 1960s he became Wollongong's most popular singer, and won a national TV talent contest. His prize was a trip to the UK. He made the journey back to Britain in 1965 and was signed by the Noel Gay Organisation. After returning to Australia he continued his showbiz career with concerts and TV appearances. In January 1967 he sailed again to England with his manager, Mr. Ossie Byrne. It is thought that he still had relatives in Stoke-on-Trent at that time.

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    Barry commented  · 

    A little “nostalgia” for all Old Wulfrunians who once said. “Will you take me in Please?.

    Nowadays the first experience of a cinema visit for a child is probably on occasion to see a new Disney release or the like, but my first visit was nothing like that.

    It was in the summer of 1943. The place the “Savoy’ in Garrick Street there was just my mother and I, dad was away on war work, at that time.

    I remember we queued at the entrance to the front stalls at the corner of Old Hall Street, and when we finally recieved our tickets and went down the stairs into the cinema I recall we had to stand for awhile just 50yds from the screen and the main feature a western, “Jesse James” was halfway through.

    I gazed up at this large screen and in full technicolour, what a sight, it was awe inspiring to me as a six year, old.

    After waiting a short while standing looking looking up at the screen we were found two seats, and as the film reached its climax , and the background music; the hymn, “Yes Jesus loves me” played at ‘Jesse’s funeral , the sorrowful tears ran down my face, and at that moment I was completely lost to films, and film music forever.

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  4. 1,693 votes
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    Barry commented  · 

    filbert st.. obvious reasons
    granby halls.. had many a night skating there
    cascade amusements one on the corner near palais/life
    burger king.. not too dissapointed but cant believe none left in leicester now lol..
    original john lewis and the bridge to it.. as an early teen would spend a saturday mooching round lewis, on the bridge, in the haymarket..
    spectrum/junction 21..
    weavers/ showrooms/ o4/ lalle bella/ matiche..
    tandy electronic store..

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